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Tobacco Free Partnership of Lake County Raises Awareness on the Dangers of Tobacco

By Noelda Lopez

May 27, 2016

Tobacco Free Partnership of Lake County Raises Awareness on the Dangers of Tobacco  

Eustis, Fla.The Florida Department of Health’s Tobacco Free Florida program and the Tobacco Free Partnership of Lake County are celebrating World No Tobacco Day by highlighting the significant progress made in the fight against tobacco and raising awareness on the many dangers of tobacco use.

Each year, the public health community observes World No Tobacco Day on May 31 to focus on the health risks associated with tobacco use and protect future generations by reducing tobacco consumption.

In celebration on World No Tobacco Day, the Tobacco Free Partnership of Lake County will be setting up an information table to raise awareness of second hand smoke exposure and free tobacco cessation resources to the residents of Silver Pointe at Leesburg Apartments. This event marks the 60 day count down to the property adopting a tobacco free policy.

Despite the approximately 1,300 deaths in the U.S. caused by smoking every day,[1] cigarette smoking in Florida has continued to decline among adults and teens. The cigarette smoking rate among Florida adults has decreased by 8.8 percent – from 19.3 percent in 2011 to 17.6 percent in 2014.[2] Cigarette smoking among Florida high school students dropped from 11.9 percent in 2011 to 6.9 percent in 2015,[3] one of the lowest high school cigarette smoking rates in the country.

“Florida has made great strides in the fight against tobacco,” said Tobacco Free Florida Bureau Chief Valerie Lacy. “While I am encouraged by the progress made statewide and right here in Lake County, there is still more work to be done to continue to reduce tobacco consumption and protect future generations.”

Tobacco has killed more than 20 million people prematurely since the first Surgeon General’s report in 1964 and still today, smoking remains the leading preventable cause of disease and death in the U.S.[4] Floridians who want to quit any form of tobacco have access to Tobacco Free Florida’s FREE and proven-effective resources. Visit tobaccofreeflorida.com to learn more.

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 ABOUT TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA

The Florida Department of Health’s Tobacco Free Florida campaign is a statewide cessation and prevention campaign funded by Florida’s tobacco settlement fund. Tobacco users interested in quitting are encouraged to use one of the state’s three ways to quit. Since 2007, more than 137,000 Floridians have successfully quit, using one of these free services. To learn more about Tobacco Free Florida and the state’s free quit resources, visit www.tobaccofreeflorida.com or follow the campaign on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TobaccoFreeFlorida or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/tobaccofreefla.

The department works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts.

Follow us on Twitter at @HealthyFla and on Facebook.  For more information about the Florida Department of Health please visit www.floridahealth.gov.


[1] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking —50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014

[2] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Prevalence and Trends Data, 2014. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.

[3] Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS), Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, 2015

[4] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking —50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014